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Tyne Ferries



 
This page shows postcards and images of the local ferries on the River Tyne. The sole remaining route is the Shields Ferry between South Shields (Market Place) and North Shields (North Quay). The south terminal is situated just 5 minutes from South Shields Metro station. the north terminal is a steep 10 minute walk to North shields Metro station, but ferries are me by bus number 333 which is free for ferry passengers. For more details see:  www.nexus.org.uk/ferry

Early Tyne Ferries
Before the age of steam small sculler boat ferries crossed the Tyne at many locations. Above Newcastle on the section of river up to Scotswood (where a suspension bridge was built in 1832 followed by a railway bridge in 1839) there were ferries at Benwall (to the Delta Iron Works), Elswick High Ferry (to Armstrong's works), Elswick (Low) Ferry and the Redheugh Ferry.

The number of ferries on the Mid-Tyne section between Newcastle and the sea increased as industry expanded along both banks. Minor ferries included the Ouseburn Ferry (to 1948), Mushroom Ferry (to 1900), St Peter's Ferry (to 1940), Felling Shore Ferry (to 1890), Heworth Shore Ferry (to 1900) and St Anthony's Ferry (to 1945). Those which survived into the Twentieth Century often converted to using motor boats. The Wincomblee Ferry (or Early Ferry) was operated by Edward Redhead and his son from Wincomblee Quay in the early 1800s. The site moved when William Dobson built his shipyard in 1883. The north bank became the Armstrong's walker Naval Yard in 1912, built to relieve the Elswick works. Battleships built here included HMS Malaya, HMS Nelson and HMS King George V. A sculler boat continued to run the ferry until WW2. Another sculler boat operated from Low Walker to Tyne View until 1948.

Mid-Tyne Ferry - Hebburn to Wallsend & Walker
The next ferry downstream was a route from Hebburn to Wallsend/Walker, started by Andrew Leslie in the 1850s to bring workers to his shipyard in Hebburn, initially from Wallsend, probably replacing an earlier sculler ferry. Andrew Leslie amalgamated with R&W Hawthorn before 1890 to form Hawthorn Leslie. They acquired two second hand steamers Hebburn and Wallsend in 1903. Wallsend had been built in 1890 for use on the Clyde. A second route to Walker started in 1910 for which two smaller boats Fairy Queen and Walker were bought. In 1938, Hawthorn Leslie pushed to have the ferry taken over by the local authorities. Because the the ferries were old and required replacement, they threatened to withdraw the services. They deferred the closure for three months by which time the war had started. From late 1939 the ferry was run by Mid-Tyne Ferries Ltd of Hebburn, jointly owned by shipbuilders Swan Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Hawthorn Leslie, and Vickers-Armstrong, plus electrical engineers A.Reyrolle. They soon ordered two new diesel ferries Mid-Tyne Nos 1 & Mid-Tyne No.2 delivered in 1940, replacing Fairy Queen and Walker, the latter being sold to become reserve ferry between Howden & Jarrow. Hebburn was sunk in 1940 after a collision with a tug. Mid-Tyne No 3  was delivered in 1949 to replace the Wallsend, the last of the original four ferries. The three new diesel boats were later renamed Tyne Queen, Tyne Princess and Tyne Duchess. They were used to run river cruises during the summer months. Usage of the ferries reduced as the shipbuilding industry declined. In 1968, ownership of Mid-Tyne ferries passed to the Swan Hunter Group. The Walker Naval Yard closed in 1985 and the ferry service ceased on July 25th the following year, the boats being sold for excursion use.

Willington Quay/Howden to Jarrow Ferries
There may have been a ford at Jarrow in Roman times. Subsequently sculler boats ran ferry services. Unverified reports state that two steamers Punch and Judy ran in 1852 for Charles Palmer who had opened his shipyard at Jarrow. In 1854 the underpowered Palmers-built Tom Tit had a brief life on the Jarrow ferry, and was probably the first steam ferry on the Tyne. Palmers built the 38ton Punch for the route in 1861, but she was sold to the Tyne General Ferry Company in 1863, who ran her until1883. The Shields Direct Ferry Company also started a vehicle (horse & cart) ferry between Willington Quay and Jarrow in the 1850s using the Tyne. This service was later run by the Tyne Improvement Commission. In 1883, Jarrow Corporation built the G.H.Dexter, followed by the C.M.Palmer in 1884, both capable of carrying horses and carts between Jarrow and Howden. In 1899, Jarrow Corporation sold the service to the Tyne General Ferry Company. This company failed in 1909, but the profitable Jarrow-Howden ferry was sold to Robert Frazier & Sons. The C.M.Palmer  sank in 1916. Jarrow Corporation repurchased the ferry, with the G.H.Dexter, in 1919. She was replaced by the A.B.Gowan in 1921, which could carry five lorries and 300 passengers, or just 565 passengers. Passenger usage declined when the Tyne Pedestrian and Cyclist Tunnel opened in 1951. The Tyne Tunnel was opened on 19th October 1967 and A.B.Gowan finished service that day, making a final crossing on 4th November after which she was scrapped.


Shields Ferries
The earliest records of a ferry between North and South Shields are from 1377. In 1588 the Old Landing Ferry was running from the Coble Landing area of eastern South Shields. the North Shields landing was west of Cliffords Fort and later Clive Street. Most ferries were passenger only, but a 'horse boat' was ordered in 1588. There have been numerous proposals to bridge the Tyne near North & South Shields, but none came to anything. Following the failure of an 1826 bridge proposal, alternatives were sought. The Shields Ferry Act of 1829 established the North & South Shields Ferry Company, to convey passengers, carriages, horses, cattle and goods. Regular services began in July 1830 between market Street/New Quay in South Shields to Ferry Street/Market Place in North Shields, both close to the current pier locations. The first steamboat Baron Rewcastle proved to be inadequate, and a second vessel Durham (1), of unusual catamaran form with a single central paddle wheel, was possibly little better. A third boat Northumberland (1), replacing the Baron Rewcastle in 1830, proved to be unstable, but ran until 1883. Both Durham (1) and Northumberland (1) had a tendency to run aground.

Competition arrived in 1847 when the Tyne Direct Ferry Company was formed, running the Percy between the New Quay to Kinton's Quay in North Shields. The Direct Ferry was known as the Ha'penny Dodger, from the fare charged and the way it dodged between other river traffic. Amalgamation of the two companies followed in 1949. A third service was run in from 1856 between Whitehill Pont and West Holborn using the steamer Favourite. The Tyne Improvement Commission was empowered by an act of Parliament to buy the Tyne ferries, and acquired the Shields Ferry for £39,000 in 1863. At this time the fleet was the horse & cart ferries Durham (1) and Northumberland on the Market Place ferry, and the Tyne on the Jarrow Ferry. Passenger vessel Percy ran the Direct Ferry and Favourite worked the Whitehill route. New ferries followed the takeover with the vehicle ferries Durham (2) in 1866, Tyne (2) in 1869 and Tynemouth (1) in 1883, all used on the Market Place ferry. New passenger ferries included the Shields (1868) and J.R.Proctor (1890) for the Whitehill Point route, plus the Collingwood (1)  (1896) for the Direct Ferry.

There was a failed scheme to build a transporter bridge in 1901, after which Tyne Improvement Commission promoted a Parliamentary Bill to enable it to improve the ferries. This was enacted in 1902 with the provision of two new, larger pontoons at North Shields, one serving the market Place ferry and the other for the Direct Ferry and Tyne General ferry Company's steamers (which provided services along the river). Similar improvements were made at the Market Place terminal. New ferries built were the passenger boats George Armstrong (1904) for the Direct Ferry, plus Thomas Richardson and U.A.Ritson in 1906 for the Market Place route. The new vehicle ferry South Shields was built for the Market Place route in 1911. She survived until 1968. Further new vehicle ferries were the Tynemouth (2) of 1925 and the Northumbrian in 1930. These vessels continued running the ferries for many years, despite increasing complaints about the service. A new Collingwood (2) was acquired in 1939, replacing the original Collingwood (1)  on the Direct Ferry. The Whitehill Point service ceased in 1941 due to war damage. It was briefly reinstated on an experimental basis in 1951 using the steam launch Osmia, but ceased permanently the following year once Parliamentary permission had been obtained. The next ferry to close was the Direct route in 1954, the Collingwood (2) being sold for conversion into a yacht. The Market Place ferry was still busy, carrying around 400,000 vehicles a year. This traffic almost disappeared as soon as the Tyne Tunnel was built in 1967. The 1911 South Shields was withdrawn in March 1968 and broken up, followed in April by the 1925 Tynemouth (2) . Northumbrian continued alone until the arrival of the first modern ferry in 1972.

Modern passenger ferries used have been the Freda Cunningham  (1972-1994), Shieldsman  (1976-2008), Pride of the Tyne (1993), and Spirit of the Tyne (2007), the latter two maintaining the service in 2011.


 

Vessels on this Page
   A.B.Gowan - Jarrow Ferry
   Beatrice  - Tyne General Ferry
   Collingwood (2)  - Shields Direct Ferry
   Freda Cunningham  - Shields Ferry
   Mid-Tyne No.1  - Mid-Tyne Ferry
   Mid-Tyne No.2  - Mid-Tyne Ferry
   Mid-Tyne No.3  - Mid-Tyne Ferry
   Northumbrian  - Shields Ferry
   Pride of the Tyne  - Shields Ferry
   Shieldsman  - Shields Ferry
   South Shields  - Shields Ferry
   Spirit of the Tyne  - Shields Ferry
   Tynemouth (1)  - Shields Ferry
   Tynemouth (2)  - Shields Ferry
   Tyne Queen  - Mid-Tyne Ferry
   Tyne Princess  - Mid-Tyne Ferry
   Tyne Duchess  - Mid-Tyne Ferry

Sections on this Page
 

Associated Pages

References
Contacts
Timetable archive



Tyne Ferries





Mid-Tyne Ferries

The next ferry downstream was a route from Hebburn to Wallsend/Walker, started by Andrew Leslie in the 1850s to bring workers to his shipyard in Hebburn, initially from Wallsend, probably replacing an earlier sculler ferry. Andrew Leslie amalgamated with R&W Hawthorn before 1890 to form Hawthorn Leslie. They acquired two second hand steamers Hebburn and Wallsend in 1903. Wallsend had been built in 1890 for use on the Clyde. A second route to Walker started in 1910 for which two smaller boats Fairy Queen and Walker were bought. In 1938, Hawthorn Leslie pushed to have the ferry taken over by the local authorities. Because the the ferries were old and required replacement, they threatened to withdraw the services. They deferred the closure for three months by which time the war had started. From late 1939 the ferry was run by Mid-Tyne Ferries Ltd of Hebburn, jointly owned by shipbuilders Swan Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Hawthorn Leslie, and Vickers-Armstrong, plus electrical engineers A.Reyrolle. They soon ordered two new diesel ferries Mid-Tyne Nos 1 & Mid-Tyne No.2 delivered in 1940, replacing Fairy Queen and Walker, the latter being sold to become reserve ferry between Howden & Jarrow. Hebburn was sunk in 1940 after a collision with a tug. Mid-Tyne No 3  was delivered in 1949 to replace the Wallsend, the last of the original four ferries. After withdrawal, the Wallsend was used for a gun battle in the film Get Carter.

The three new diesel boats were later renamed Tyne Queen, Tyne Princess and Tyne Duchess. They were used to run river cruises during the summer months. Usage of the ferries reduced as the shipbuilding industry declined. In 1968, ownership of Mid-Tyne ferries passed to the Swan Hunter Group. The Walker Naval Yard closed in 1985 and the ferry service ceased on July 25th the following year, the boats being sold for excursion use.



Hebburn
(1903-1940)


 Hebburn  of Mid-Tyne Ferries
HEBBURN - Mid Tyne Ferries - www.simplonpc.co.uk







Mid-Tyne No.1 - Tyne Queen
(1940-1986)


 Tyne Queen  of Mid-Tyne Ferries
TYNE QUEEN - Mid Tyne Ferries - www.simplonpc.co.uk







Mid-Tyne No.2 - Tyne Princess
(1940-1986)


 Tyne Princess  of Mid-Tyne Ferries
TYNE QUEEN - Mid Tyne Ferries - www.simplonpc.co.uk







Mid-Tyne No.3 - Tyne Duchess
(1949-1967)


 Tyne Duchess  of Mid-Tyne Ferries
TYNE QUEEN - Mid Tyne Ferries - www.simplonpc.co.uk







Jarrow Ferries

This section is under construction

There may have been a ford at Jarrow in Roman times. Subsequently sculler boats ran ferry services. Unverified reports state that two steamers Punch and Judy ran in 1852 for Charles Palmer who had opened his shipyard at Jarrow. In 1854 the underpowered Palmers-built Tom Tit had a brief life on the Jarrow ferry, and was probably the first steam ferry on the Tyne. Palmers built the 38ton Punch for the route in 1861, but she was sold to the Tyne General Ferry Company in 1863, who ran her until1883. The Shields Direct Ferry Company also started a vehicle (horse & cart) ferry between Willington Quay and Jarrow in the 1850s using the Tyne. This service was later run by the Tyne Improvement Commission. In 1883, Jarrow Corporation built the G.H.Dexter, followed by the C.M.Palmer in 1884, both capable of carrying horses and carts between Jarrow and Howden. In 1899, Jarrow Corporation sold the service to the Tyne General Ferry Company. This company failed in 1909, but the profitable Jarrow-Howden ferry was sold to Robert Frazier & Sons. The C.M.Palmer  sank in 1916. Jarrow Corporation repurchased the ferry, with the G.H.Dexter, in 1919. She was replaced by the A.B.Gowan in 1921, which could carry five lorries and 300 passengers, or just 565 passengers. Passenger usage declined when the Tyne Pedestrian and Cyclist Tunnel opened in 1951. The Tyne Tunnel was opened on 19th October 1967 and A.B.Gowan finished service that day, making a final crossing on 4th November after which she was scrapped.



A.B.Gowan
(1921-1967)


 A.B.Gowan  on the Jarrow Ferry
A.B.Gowan - River Tyne - Jarrow Ferry - www.simplonpc.co.uk



 A.B.Gowan  on the Jarrow Ferry
A.B.Gowan - River Tyne - Jarrow Ferry - www.simplonpc.co.uk







Shields Ferry


The sole remaining River Tyne ferry route is the Shields Ferry between South Shields (Market Place) and North Shields (North Quay). The south terminal is situated just 5 minutes from South Shields Metro station. the north terminal is a steep 10 minute walk to North shields Metro station, but ferries are me by bus number 333 which is free for ferry passengers. For more details see:  www.nexus.org.uk/ferry

Ferries have linked North and South Shields since medieval times. By the nineteenth century, ferries were running which could carry animals and goods as well as foot passengers. Proposals for bridges linking the two towns came to nothing and the ferries remained the only means of crossing the Tyne at Shields. The present Market Place ferry has been running for a great many years and as the other ferries have gradually disappeared is the only one remaining. It was also the only one to carry vehicles, although it no longer does so. It leaves from the ferry landing near the Market Place in South Shields and the New Quay at North Shields and is known nowadays as the Shields Ferry.

In 1827, following failed proposals for a bridge, a company was set up and a Parliamentary Act obtained to operate a ferry between North and South Shields run, appropriately enough, by The North and South Shields Ferry Company. Starting in 1830 the ferry carried passengers, cattle and goods across the Tyne with landings at the Market Place/New quay in North Shields and at Ferry Street in South Shields near the Market Place on a similar route to today's ferries. Other ferries sprang up to compete and the Direct Ferry and the Whitehill Point Ferry operated between different points on the river also linking the two Shields. In 1863 the Tyne Improvement Commission (TIC) made use of their powers to acquire any ferry, and bought up the three ferries, instituting a new ferry company and improving the service with new boats and better ferry landings. The service was often criticised for its lack of capacity and inefficiency both before and after TIC involvement. It hindered shipping movements and was cancelled whenever fog descended on the river.

By 1954 only the Market Place vehicular ferry was still running, using three boats. Following the opening of the Tyne Tunnel in 1967 the number of vehicles carried was very small. The old boats, the South Shields and the Tynemouth (2) were withdrawn from service and, after the introduction of a new diesel-engined boat carrying foot passengers only, the Northumbrian went too, becoming for a time a floating restaurant at Bill Quay, Gateshead. This new boat was the Freda Cunningham, making her debut in 1972, but unfortunately prone to mechanical failure. Another new boat, Shieldsman, appeared in 1976 and she was joined in 1994 by the Pride Of The Tyne which between them maintained the ferry service until recently, also providing pleasure trips up and down the river. The Freda Cunningham was sold. By this time the ferries were run by the Tyneside, later Tyne and Wear, Passenger Transport Executive. Bus links at North Shields are provided, at South Shields the ferry landing is only three minutes walk from the Market Place. New ferry landings were installed recently and a new ferry, Spirit Of The Tyne, to replace the Shieldsman, entered service in May 2007. Shieldsman was moved to Shoreham in Sussex for conversion into a house boat. The present service operated by Nexus runs half-hourly from 0645 until 2240 with a reduced service on Sundays.



Unidentified paddle steamer at South Shields, Tynemouth (1) or Northumberland (2)?
River Tyne - Shields Ferry - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Unidentified paddle steamer at South Shields, Tynemouth (1) or Northumberland (2)?
River Tyne - Shields Ferry - www.simplonpc.co.uk







Tynemouth (1)
(1883-1924)


 Tynemouth (1) a passenger ferry on the Market Place Ferry
TYNEMOUTH (1) - River Tyne - Shields Ferry -www.simplonpc.co.uk







U.A.Ritson
(1906-1930)


 U.A.Ritson a passenger ferry on the Market Place Ferry
U.A.RITSON - River Tyne - Shields Ferry -www.simplonpc.co.uk







South Shields
(1911-1964)


 South Shields a vehicle ferry on the Market Place ferry
SOUTH SHIELDS - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - www.simplonpc.co.uk



 South Shields a vehicle ferry on the Market Place ferry
SOUTH SHIELDS - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - www.simplonpc.co.uk



 South Shields laid up after withdrawal in 1968?
SOUTH SHIELDS - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - www.simplonpc.co.uk







Tynemouth (2)
(1925-1968)


 Tynemouth (2) a vehicle ferry on the Market Place Ferry
TYNEMOUTH (2) - River Tyne - Shields Ferry -www.simplonpc.co.uk







Northumbrian
(1930-1972)


 Northumbrian a vehicle ferry on the Market Place Ferry
NORTHUMBRIAN - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - www.simplonpc.co.uk



 Northumbrian  on the Market Place Ferry
NORTHUMBRIAN - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - www.simplonpc.co.uk



 Northumbrian  on the Market Place Ferry
NORTHUMBRIAN - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - www.simplonpc.co.uk



 Northumbrian on the Market Place Ferry
Photo ©1972 Hilton Davis

NORTHUMBRIAN - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo © Hilton Davis - www.simplonpc.co.uk



 Northumbrian in use as a restaurant and bar
Photo ©1973 Hilton Davis

NORTHUMBRIAN - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo © Hilton Davis - www.simplonpc.co.uk



 Northumbrian in use as a restaurant and bar
Photo ©1973 Hilton Davis

NORTHUMBRIAN - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo © Hilton Davis - www.simplonpc.co.uk







Collingwood
(1939-1954)


 Collingwood a passnger ferry on the Direct Ferry
COLLINGWOOD - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©Ian Boyle - www.simplonpc.co.uk







Freda Cunningham
(1976-2008)


The Freda Cunningham was commissioned in 1972, when the ferry service was still known as the Market Place Ferry. Freda Cunningham had a reputation for unreliability and was frequently out of service. She was named after the wife of North East Labour Party leader Andy Cunningham, whose son was the politician and cabinet minister, Jack Cunningham. She was sold in 1993 when the Pride of The Tyne came into service.



Freda Cunningham in Tyne & Wear PTE yellow
Photo © Hilton Davis

FREDA CUNNINGHAM - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©Hilton Davis - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Freda Cunningham in Tyne & Wear PTE yellow
Photo © Hilton Davis

FREDA CUNNINGHAM - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©Hilton Davis - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Freda Cunningham in Tyne & Wear PTE yellow
Photo © Hilton Davis

FREDA CUNNINGHAM - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©Hilton Davis - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Freda Cunningham in Tyne & Wear PTE yellow
Photo © Hilton Davis

FREDA CUNNINGHAM - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©Hilton Davis - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Freda Cunningham in Tyne & Wear PTE yellow
Photo © Ian Boyle

FREDA CUNNINGHAM - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©Ian Boyle - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Freda Cunningham in Tyne & Wear PTE yellow
Photo © Ian Boyle

FREDA CUNNINGHAM - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©Ian Boyle - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Freda Cunningham and Shieldsman in Tyne & Wear PTE yellow
Photo © Ian Boyle

FREDA CUNNINGHAM - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©Ian Boyle - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Freda Cunningham and Shieldsman in Tyne & Wear PTE yellow
Photo © Ian Boyle

FREDA CUNNINGHAM - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©Ian Boyle - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Freda Cunningham in Tyne & Wear PTE yellow
Photo © Ian Boyle

FREDA CUNNINGHAM - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©Ian Boyle - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Freda Cunningham in Tyne & Wear PTE yellow
Photo © Ian Boyle

FREDA CUNNINGHAM - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©Ian Boyle - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Freda Cunningham in Tyne & Wear PTE yellow
Photo © Ian Boyle

FREDA CUNNINGHAM - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©Ian Boyle - www.simplonpc.co.uk







Shieldsman
(1976-2008)


The Shieldsman was built by Hancock Shipbuilders of Pembroke Dock and entered service in 1976. The ferry is double ended, and can operate either way, however she typically worked one way, and turned around as part of the crossing over the Tyne. Shieldsman could carry 350 passengers in public service, or a reduced capacity of 250 on private hire. The Shieldsman was retired early in 2007, at the age of 30, to be replaced by the new Spirit of the Tyne. Nexus sold the Shieldsman in 2008 to a private buyer from the Portsmouth area. In March 2010, the Shieldsman was moored on the River Adur in Shoreham-by-Sea for conversion into a house boat. The Shieldsman was powered by twin 8LXB Gardner engines and the electricity was powered by Lister generators


Shieldsman in Tyne & Wear PTE yellow
Photo © Hilton Davis

SHIELDSMAN - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©Hilton Davis - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Shieldsman in Tyne & Wear PTE yellow
Photo © Ian Boyle

SHIELDSMAN - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©Ian Boyle - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Shieldsman in Tyne & Wear PTE yellow
Photo © Ian Boyle

SHIELDSMAN - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©Ian Boyle - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Shieldsman in Tyne & Wear PTE yellow
Photo © Ian Boyle

SHIELDSMAN - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©Ian Boyle - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Shieldsman in Tyne & Wear PTE yellow
Photo © Ian Boyle

SHIELDSMAN - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©Ian Boyle - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Shieldsman in Tyne & Wear PTE yellow
Photo © Ian Boyle

SHIELDSMAN - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©Ian Boyle - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Shieldsman in later blue livery
Photo © Hilton Davis

SHIELDSMAN - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©Hilton Davis - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Shieldsman in later blue livery
Photo © Hilton Davis

SHIELDSMAN - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©Hilton Davis - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Shieldsman at Shoreham, Sussex, being converted into a house boat.
Photo ©2010 Ian Boyle

SHIELDSMAN - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©2010 Ian Boyle - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Shieldsman at Shoreham, Sussex, amongst some of the other interesting vessels moored there
Photo ©2010 Ian Boyle

SHIELDSMAN - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©2010 Ian Boyle - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Shieldsman at Shoreham, Sussex, amongst some of the other interesting vessels moored there
Photo ©2010 Ian Boyle

SHIELDSMAN - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©2010 Ian Boyle - www.simplonpc.co.uk







Pride of the Tyne
(1993- )


The Pride of the Tyne was built by Swan Hunters in nearby Wallsend and entered service in 1993. She was a modified version of the Shieldsman and cost £1.5 million. The vessel also has a bar, The Admirals Locker, that is available on private hire and river cruises. The vessel was also the first river ferry to incorporate all of the new safety features introduced after the Marchioness disaster in 1989. The Pride of the Tyne is powered by twin Gardner 6LXDT diesels with twin Perkins generators


Pride of the Tyne in Tyne & Wear PTE yellow
Photo © Hilton Davis

PRIDE OF THE TYNE - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©Hilton Davis - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Pride of the Tyne in advertising livery
Photo © Hilton Davis

PRIDE OF THE TYNE - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©Hilton Davis - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Pride of the Tyne in advertising livery
Photo © Hilton Davis

PRIDE OF THE TYNE - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©Hilton Davis - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Pride of the Tyne in advertising livery
Photo © Hilton Davis

PRIDE OF THE TYNE - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©Hilton Davis - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Pride of the Tyne in an earlier blue livery
Photo © Hilton Davis

PRIDE OF THE TYNE - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©Hilton Davis - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Pride of the Tyne at South Shields
Photo ©2010 Ian Boyle

PRIDE OF THE TYNE - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©2010 Ian Boyle - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Pride of the Tyne at South Shields
Photo ©2010 Ian Boyle

PRIDE OF THE TYNE - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©2010 Ian Boyle - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Pride of the Tyne at South Shields
Photo ©2010 Ian Boyle

PRIDE OF THE TYNE - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©2010 Ian Boyle - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Pride of the Tyne at South Shields
Photo ©2011 Ian Boyle

PRIDE OF THE TYNE - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©2011 Ian Boyle - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Pride of the Tyne at South Shields
Photo ©2011 Ian Boyle

PRIDE OF THE TYNE - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©2011 Ian Boyle - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Pride of the Tyne at South Shields
Photo ©2011 Ian Boyle

PRIDE OF THE TYNE - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©2011 Ian Boyle - www.simplonpc.co.uk







Spirit of the Tyne
(2007- )


A new ferry, the Spirit of the Tyne, entered service in 2007, replacing the Shieldsman, which was retired after 30 years. The new ferry is similar to recent Portsmouth-Gosport ferries and differs greatly from the Shieldsman and Pride of the Tyne.


Spirit of the Tyne
Photo © Hilton Davis

SPIRIT OF THE TYNE - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©Hilton Davis - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Spirit of the Tyne
Photo © Hilton Davis

SPIRIT OF THE TYNE - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©Hilton Davis - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Spirit of the Tyne at North Shields
Photo ©2010 Ian Boyle

SPIRIT OF THE TYNE - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©2010 Ian Boyle - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Spirit of the Tyne and Pride of the Tyne at South Shields
Photo ©2010 Ian Boyle

SPIRIT OF THE TYNE - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©2010 Ian Boyle - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Spirit of the Tyne leaving South Shields
Photo ©2010 Ian Boyle

SPIRIT OF THE TYNE - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©2010 Ian Boyle - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Spirit of the Tyne arriving at South Shields
Photo ©2011 Ian Boyle

SPIRIT OF THE TYNE - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©2011 Ian Boyle - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Spirit of the Tyne arriving at South Shields
Photo ©2011 Ian Boyle

SPIRIT OF THE TYNE - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©2011 Ian Boyle - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Spirit of the Tyne arriving at South Shields
Photo ©2011 Ian Boyle

SPIRIT OF THE TYNE - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©2011 Ian Boyle - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Spirit of the Tyne arriving at South Shields
Photo ©2011 Ian Boyle

SPIRIT OF THE TYNE - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©2011 Ian Boyle - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Spirit of the Tyne arriving at South Shields
Photo ©2011 Ian Boyle

SPIRIT OF THE TYNE - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©2011 Ian Boyle - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Spirit of the Tyne leaving North Shields
Photo ©2011 Ian Boyle

SPIRIT OF THE TYNE - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©2011 Ian Boyle - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Spirit of the Tyne leaving North Shields
Photo ©2011 Ian Boyle

SPIRIT OF THE TYNE - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©2011 Ian Boyle - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Spirit of the Tyne leaving North Shields
Photo ©2011 Ian Boyle

SPIRIT OF THE TYNE - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©2011 Ian Boyle - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Spirit of the Tyne leaving North Shields
Photo ©2011 Ian Boyle

SPIRIT OF THE TYNE - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©2011 Ian Boyle - www.simplonpc.co.uk



On board Spirit of the Tyne leaving South Shields
Photo ©2011 Ian Boyle

SPIRIT OF THE TYNE - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - Photo ©2011 Ian Boyle - www.simplonpc.co.uk







Shields Ferry Publicity

A new ferry, the Spirit of the Tyne, entered service in 2007, replacing the Shieldsman, which was retired after 30 years. The new ferry is similar to recent Portsmouth-Gosport ferries and differs greatly from the Shieldsman and Pride of the Tyne.


Shields Ferry 2010 timetable

April 2010 Shields Timetable - Download full copy of 16 panel brochure (3.7 MB pdf file)
2010 Timetable - River Tyne - Shields Ferry - www.simplonpc.co.uk







Tyne General Ferry Company

This section is under construction

Unidentified paddle steamer of the Tyne General Ferry Company by the Newcastle High Level and Swing Bridges
River Tyne - Tyne General Ferry - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Unidentified paddle steamer of the Tyne General Ferry Company by the Newcastle High Level and Swing Bridges
River Tyne - Tyne General Ferry - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Unidentified paddle steamer of the Tyne General Ferry Company by the Newcastle High Level and Swing Bridges
Enlarged image of the steamer in the card above

River Tyne - Tyne General Ferry - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Postcard of Mauretania (1) leaving the Tyne followed by a Tyne General paddle steamer
MAURETANIA - Cunard Line - www.simplonpc.co.uk







Beatrice (11883)

 Beatrice (1883) of the Tyne General Ferry Company by the Newcastle High Level and Swing Bridges
BEATRICE (1883) - River Tyne - Tyne General Ferry - www.simplonpc.co.uk







Tyne General Advertising Cards

Advertising card for Tyne General Ferries showing a paddle steamer similar to Beatrice above
River Tyne - Tyne General Ferry - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Advertising card for Tyne General Ferries showing a paddle steamer
Alternative copy of the card above

River Tyne - Tyne General Ferry - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Advertising card for Tyne General Ferries showing a paddle tug
River Tyne - Tyne General Ferry - www.simplonpc.co.uk



Postcard of Mauretania (1), advertising the Tyne General Ferry Company's trips past the yard where she was being built
Tyne Ferry & RMS Mauretania - www.simplonpc.o.uk





















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